July 1st China Visa Changes?

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  • Vincent
    Member

    Has anyone heard of this too? I’m on this other forum and everybody is being very dramatic about it. I’m not sure what’s going on exactly. Can anyone tell me? Seems like it’s going to be a lot more difficult to get visa’s and/or (keep) work(ing)?

    Some say it will be harder to do the usual visa runs to HK, and there would supposedly be limitations to where you can live?

    What’s up?

    The Chinese Government’s new immigration law will come into force on 1 July 2013, with new visa rules for foreign nationals visiting or living in China.

    The details though not yet finalised, indicate that as of 1 July, anyone wishing to stay in China more than 180 days will need a residence permit. Visit ( tourist) visas will only be extended once by a maximum of 30 days. In addition there will be the introduction of several new categories of visa including R visas – for highly skilled specialists. Work visas – Z visas – will be divided into Z1 (over 90 days) and Z2 (under ninety days), with Z1 visa holders likely to need a residence permit also. Rules for F visas (current category for business visits) may also change, with business/commercial visitors required to apply for a new “M” visa category – however please note that details of the difference between F and M types have not yet been finalised. More detailed information will be distributed once available. The new draft visa categories are as follows:

    F – non-commercial visit
    L – tourism
    G – transit visa
    Z1 – work in China over 90 days
    Z2 – work in China less than 90 days
    X1 – long term study
    X2 – short term study
    M – commercial or trade activity
    Q1 – family reunion
    Q2 – short visit visa
    R1 – highly skilled specialists
    R2 – Highly skilled specialists (less than 180 days)

    https://www.gov.uk/government/world-location-news/chinese-government-announce-new-immigration-laws

    #32358

    Charlie
    Moderator

    I haven’t heard anything about this. I’m inclined to not worry about it until it takes effect though – the pattern with regulation in China seems to always be big talk and no action. I think F-visas have been largely phased out though, it used to be that nearly everyone I knew was on an F-visa, and now I think those numbers are dwindling.

    I bet that Shanshui would know better than anyone what the actual implications of this are.

    #32365
    Mr. Klink
    Mr. Klink
    Member

    I bet that Shanshui would know better than anyone what the actual implications of this are.

    If you’re looking for someone to bung up your application and conveniently leave you with little other option than to pay an even higher pricetag for a less-than-ideal visa. Yeah, then check these folks out.

    #32381

    Charlie
    Moderator

    If you’re looking for someone to bung up your application and conveniently leave you with little other option than to pay an even higher pricetag for a less-than-ideal visa. Yeah, then check these folks out.

    I heard about your situation yesterday, that really sucks. Hopefully you can find an amicable solution when Nick returns. I’ve encountered difficulties with visa stuff before and they’ve always guided me through without major issue. I’m confident that you won’t find anyone more knowledgeable on current visa status or what the future might hold than ShanShui though.

    #32386
    Mr. Klink
    Mr. Klink
    Member

    You’ll simply find no other option, I’ll give you that.

    #32387

    Chris Ziich
    Moderator

    BritCham gave a presentation about this. I have the powerpoint to share with you all. It’s 40 slides and might make things clearer.

    You can download it here!

    #32388

    Charlie
    Moderator

    BritCham gave a presentation about this. I have the powerpoint to share with you all. It’s 40 slides and might make things clearer. You can download it here!

    This simplifies things greatly… Two things I noticed:

    This appears to be totally new – never seen or heard of this before. Looks like a 身份证 for expats. Hopefully this becomes a real thing that they actually issue to more than a dozen people across the 3 million foreigners across China.

    To my knowledge the longest residence certificate is one (or two?) years in duration – a 5 year visa would be pretty sweet. I’m looking at the from the perspective of everything visa-related in China being a constantly backwards pain in the ass.

    #32398

    Vincent
    Member

    I just had my usual PSB visa issues and immediately called Nick from Shan Shui Visa. He said I was lucky that I came 1 week before July 1st. He confirmed that it’s going to be a huge pain in the ass in the future.

    Cliffs:
    -after July 1st, it will be impossible to change visa types (he said if you enter China on a tourist L visa, YOU ARE ON YOUR OWN, he cannot help us anymore)

    -only 1 renewal will be granted for this toursit visa, so that means you’d have to leave the country every 2 months

    -it’s not just the rules that will change, it’s the entire internal system. The Public Security Ministry will start using an automized central unit for granting/printing visa’s, so it will be IMPOSSSIBLE for the PSB to just print out any visa they want (which is basically what made visa agencies such as Shan Shui able to get it for us)

    -he said that basically the only option you have if you want to stay in China for a longer time you’d have to find a Chinese company to sponsor you the paperwork/invitation for a Z visa

    I want to emphasize on the fact that Nick was NOT KIDDING about the seriousness of the situation. He said it’s not like before. Everything will change and also all the PSB’s are very worried because they will not know how to handle all this stuff.

    Sorry if it’s a bit vague, I’m just trying to paraphrase what I’ve been told.

    #32918
    Ray
    Ray
    Member

    I agree it sounds kinda scary but i look at it this way: in my field (education) there is still a shortage of teachers. Schools are continually struggling to find teachers. In other fields, China still needs legions of foreigners (such as IT). it may be more difficult to get visa in the future, but the Chinese (if nothing else) are very practical. And as all China vets know, the rules here are so vague, loopholes so prevalent and the Chinese so good at bypassing these regulations, that Im confident all will be coooool when the dust settles. If not, there’s always Taiwan….

    #32920

    Vincent
    Member

    the rules here are so vague, loopholes so prevalent and the Chinese so good at bypassing these regulations, that Im confident all will be coooool when the dust settles

    The rules were vague and there were loopholes because the PSB could basically print any Visa they want. The new central unit will make this impossible. That’s the problem.

    And I’m not going to teach English.

    #32922
    Ray
    Ray
    Member

    Big world. Lotsa beautiful cities.

    #32923

    Vincent
    Member

    But yellow fever

    #32931
    alicelilee
    alicelilee
    Member

    yeah

    #32937
    Ray
    Ray
    Member

    Today i was told that “individuals of high moral fibre and good standing in the community” will not be inconvenienced by the new reguations. Vincent, I’ve been informed by reliable sources that your moral fibre is top shelf and that your standing in the community is second to none. As for myself, the term “morally bankrupt” has been directed at me on the odd occasion….

    #32953

    I’m a little freaked out about this – I’m changing from Marriage to Work visa, planned to change..didn’t realize this issue happening on July 1st. Still need to process work permit – last one expired this March. It wont be done before the 1st…and I’m worried the court thing I experienced from 2011-2012, they’ll be like “Yeah, sorry, no visa for you” – wife, work, house – uh oh.

    Will see how it plays out. :D

    #32999
    AndrewD
    AndrewD
    Member

    -after July 1st, it will be impossible to change visa types (he said if you enter China on a tourist L visa, YOU ARE ON YOUR OWN, he cannot help us anymore)

    Will said regulation changes only prevent one from changing visas within China, or does this apply to border runs as well? I’ve been planning on coming to China on an L-visa and looking for work on the ground and then making a run to HK but these changes are making me consider seeking employment before I come over if it would mean comfortably securing a working visa.

    Also, I’ve been wondering: are there a lot of foreigners out there working illegally on L-visas? Is this ill-advised, generally? I suppose it would mean a lot of visa renewal trips, anyway.

    #33012

    Ian
    Member

    The new visa rules will not apply in Sichuan.

    #33026
    Graham
    Graham
    Member

    This is very dangerous and uninformed advice. Lots of people here are asking legitimate questions and such a comment is misleading at best. I cant understand where the facts are to back up such a statement? Hopefully nobody will take heed as the new visa rules very definitely DO apply in Sichuan and all other provinces! Why on earth would anyone think the rules would not apply here?

    I was lucky enough to go to the presentation by the Chengdu PSB office (organised by Britcham) at the beginning of May regarding the implementation of the new rules. I have the same ppt as Charlie mentions which I’m happy to send on if anyone wants it that way.

    As of the 1st July these rules will apply to all foreigners. The overall message given was that, in general, legitimate visas will be easier to get, but penalties for transgression will be higher. So try not going for the correct visa now and you risk the possibility of large fines, prison time, and deportation.

    Three new categories of potential longer permission to stay were given: by marriage (to a Chinese citizen for 5 years or more); by length of work appointment in a senior role(4 years with at least 3 in China); and by investment ($US500k or more for SW China). For marriage of sufficient length this effectively changes the old marriage visa to one which permits employment too.

    There was no discussion on the mechanics of visa conversion after entry from L to Z or whatever, but the PSB also went to great lengths to be approachable directly for any enquiries – and many of them speak good English – so I’d suggest just go there and ask or get your HR folks to do it if you have one – everyone has their own little variants so best clarify directly I’d say. The folks represented at the presentation were very approachable, as an example. The feeling I got was that they are genuinely interested in doing a better job and adhering to the rules.

    Fingerprinting will begin here in Sichuan too, possibly with other biometrics later. Also not listed in the ppt was the discussion on teachers having the correct visa. They are acutely aware that many people teaching in China do not have the correct visa and there was mention that a lot of effort will be devoted to resolving this. It may take time and may not be as effective as planned, but if you are teaching in CD I’d also advise re-checking your papers are correct.

    I think the majority of us will benefit from the changes. We are guests here after all and the onus is on us to ensure we comply with the rules.  I hope the above helps a little in this regard.

    #33030

    Ian
    Member

    How is it uniformed? When I was informed by my HR manager who deals with over 300 foriegners visas.

    My visa expires in July. I was informed of the above and no fingerprints need to be taken.

    So my advice is speak to your HR manager because at the end of the day they will be dealing with your visa.

    Peace.

    #33033
    Graham
    Graham
    Member

    Just renewed mine, with my HR representative at the PSB office. They told us we made it in time before the new rules came into force. Now it could be that the ability to take fingerprints in Chengdu/Sichuan is not completely organised by July 1st but that is very definitely the intention, and the rest of the rules apply to Sichuan as well as the rest of China.

    If your HR manager is representing 300 foreigners I’d suggest they re-check the requirements. Maybe they did not have the chance to go to the presentation but it would not do any harm to check it out. I can give you the contact details of the Vice Section Chief there if you want to pass it on to your HR?

    #33034
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